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polabeard:

Cam Damage and Jacs Fishburne. By polabeard. 2014.
Reblogging with credits intact ok.
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drivenbyboredom:

Topless Tuesday hiking with naked babes edition.

Mosquitos eating fun bags.
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circus-freaks:

William “Bill” Durks was born on April 17, 1913, in Jasper, Alabama to normal parents, and had four normal siblings. As Ward Hall wrote in My Very Unusual Friends (1991), Bill “looked like he had been hit in the face with an axe”. He suffered from frontonasal dysplasia, a birth defect that occurs when the two halves of an embryo’s face fail to come together completely. He had a deeply cleft lip and palate and a bifid, or double, nose - each half having only one nostril. In addition, he was born with both eyes sealed shut and had them surgically opened when he was a small boy, and most accounts indicate that he was blind in one eye.
Bill didn’t join the freak show until he was in his forties. A struggling sharecropper in rural Alabama, Bill was discovered at a local carnival in his hometown and invited to go on tour. He left behind his dismal life for one of fame and fortune, and became the “Man with Three Eyes”, using stage makeup to paint a third eye between the bridges of his two noses. Photographs show that Bill’s third eye was an obvious fake, but he seems to have fooled a generation of carnival-goers and was a huge success. He worked with Kelly-Sutton Shows, James E. Strates Shows and Hubert’s Museum, making up to $100 a week - a modest sum by today’s standards, but a far better living than he had made growing cotton. He even experienced Hollywood in 1973, playing a sanitorium inhabitant in Brian DePalma’s Sisters
By all accounts, Bill was a shy and introverted man, his unusual appearance having made it difficult for him to interact with people for the first forty years of his life. He usually hid his strange face under a wide-brimmed hat when on tour. He was illiterate and had a hard time talking due to the profound deformity of his lip and palate. Despite all this, however, Bill would find love in the freak show, when the “Anatomical Wonder” Melvin Burkhart introduced him to Mildred “Milly” Durks, the alligator-skinned woman.
Milly was older than Bill, having been born November 22, 1901, in New Jersey. The two were married and enjoyed many years together as the World’s Strangest Married Couple, before Milly passed away in June of 1968 in her hometown of Somerset. Bill kept right on performing for several more years before retiring to Gibsonton, where he died on May 7, 1975.
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biomedicalephemera:

Facial clefts in the embryo and adult
Early in the development of the embryo, we’re basically just a tube, with a notochord (the precursor to our nervous system) and three layers of tissue. The branchial arches, neural crest, and somites join together as they develop to form the head and neck.
To become a creature with a face, this tube must close in a very specific way, and in mammals, the way that it comes together is very similar between the species. In fact, most mammals can end up developing very similar facial deformities.
In the human, there are 15 “clefts” (separations) that join together very early on in development. The primary regions of the face are completely brought together before the embryo is even the size of a penny (17 mm - about 2/3 of an inch). Most clefts are brought together before the fetus is 1 cm long - less than the diameter of a AAA battery.
Since most of the facial clefts are some of the earliest possible non-lethal deformities, the failure of one or more of them to fuse does not stop the development, unlike many other early congenital problems. For most serious deformities at this stage, the genes simply stop giving cogent signals to one another, and the female’s body self-aborts, as it is not evolutionarily advantageous to create a non-viable fetus.
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While all facial clefts have the potential to fail to fuse, the ones that most frequently result in viable fetuses are the clefts of the palate and the maxillary processes. These can occur bilaterally (on both sides), unilaterally (only on one side), and can involve part of the palate, only the palate, only the lip, or the complete palate and lip structure. The most common defect is an isolated unilateral cleft lip, formerly known as a "harelip" (though that term is often seen as derogatory these days).
Due to the fact that the face is the way most people identify one another, its importance in human culture can make any facial deformity a problem for the person who has it. While cleft lips have been fixed for as long as people have had stitches (at least 5000 years), fixing the bone clefts has been much more difficult and daunting. In 1827, John Peter Mettauer completed the first successful bone-flap transplant to fix a cleft palate, and reconstructive surgery has only improved since then.
While most facial cleft anomalies are now routinely fixed at a very young age in industrialized nations, there are many parts of the world where hospital access is limited, and cleft deformities are not easily repaired. The loss of nutrition that suckling difficulty in children with cleft palates have can have life-long consequences. And that’s assuming the infant survives.
Charitable organizations such as Operation Smile attempt to fill that gap - literally.
biomedicalephemera:

Facial clefts in the embryo and adult
Early in the development of the embryo, we’re basically just a tube, with a notochord (the precursor to our nervous system) and three layers of tissue. The branchial arches, neural crest, and somites join together as they develop to form the head and neck.
To become a creature with a face, this tube must close in a very specific way, and in mammals, the way that it comes together is very similar between the species. In fact, most mammals can end up developing very similar facial deformities.
In the human, there are 15 “clefts” (separations) that join together very early on in development. The primary regions of the face are completely brought together before the embryo is even the size of a penny (17 mm - about 2/3 of an inch). Most clefts are brought together before the fetus is 1 cm long - less than the diameter of a AAA battery.
Since most of the facial clefts are some of the earliest possible non-lethal deformities, the failure of one or more of them to fuse does not stop the development, unlike many other early congenital problems. For most serious deformities at this stage, the genes simply stop giving cogent signals to one another, and the female’s body self-aborts, as it is not evolutionarily advantageous to create a non-viable fetus.
———————————————————————
While all facial clefts have the potential to fail to fuse, the ones that most frequently result in viable fetuses are the clefts of the palate and the maxillary processes. These can occur bilaterally (on both sides), unilaterally (only on one side), and can involve part of the palate, only the palate, only the lip, or the complete palate and lip structure. The most common defect is an isolated unilateral cleft lip, formerly known as a "harelip" (though that term is often seen as derogatory these days).
Due to the fact that the face is the way most people identify one another, its importance in human culture can make any facial deformity a problem for the person who has it. While cleft lips have been fixed for as long as people have had stitches (at least 5000 years), fixing the bone clefts has been much more difficult and daunting. In 1827, John Peter Mettauer completed the first successful bone-flap transplant to fix a cleft palate, and reconstructive surgery has only improved since then.
While most facial cleft anomalies are now routinely fixed at a very young age in industrialized nations, there are many parts of the world where hospital access is limited, and cleft deformities are not easily repaired. The loss of nutrition that suckling difficulty in children with cleft palates have can have life-long consequences. And that’s assuming the infant survives.
Charitable organizations such as Operation Smile attempt to fill that gap - literally.